Look to the Skies!

Three upcoming astrological events to look for this year.

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A Supermoon on May 25 and 26

Daniela Ortiz, Staff Writer

Has school been stressing you out? Have recent events started to overwhelm you? Has Earth just gotten you down in general? Well, you’re in luck because this article has nothing to do with our favorite blue planet! Instead, you’re going to be able to learn about all the cool things happening in our skies in the coming months. Space has a cornucopia of events lined up for this year from super moons to meteor showers, and the best part is that they are accessible from the comfort of your own backyard. How cool is that? All you need is a view of the sky and a hint of wonder to enjoy all that space has to offer! Now, without further ado, here are the top three major astrological occurrences happening in our skies in 2021.

 

Supermoon: Exactly When You Should Look At This Week's 'Super Worm Moon'#1: A Supermoon (May 25 – May 26)

That’s right! On May 25 and 26, the moon will be as close to the Earth as possible during perigee, and it will also be a full moon. These synchronous events are the ingredients for a super moon, which can be up to 15% brighter than an average moon!

 

Perseids meteor shower predicted on August 11 and 12: Here's how you can  watch | The News Minute#2: The Perseid Meteor Shower (August 11 – August 12)

This meteor shower produces roughly one meteor per minute, and it is not something you want to miss. The shower is the result of debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle, a comet around the same size as the one that hit Earth and killed the dinosaurs. What’s more, these showers are some of the brightest out there, and they happen annually at around the same time period!

 

 

Partial Lunar Eclipses#3: An Almost Total Lunar Eclipse (November 19)

Although a total lunar eclipse happens earlier in the year, residents of Georgia would not be able to see it the way those living on the Pacific Rim could; however, this lunar eclipse’s prime viewing spot is all of North America. During the partial eclipse, Earth will cover all but around 3% of the moon, meaning it is completely visible to the naked eye. With the slight portion left uncovered coupled with the slight orangey glow the eclipse gives it, the moon will be a sight to behold on this night. 

Space has a cornucopia of events lined up for this year from super moons to meteor showers, and the best part is that they are accessible from the comfort of your own backyard.