Reporting the news since 1914

The Blue & Gold

Reporting the news since 1914

The Blue & Gold

Reporting the news since 1914

The Blue & Gold

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Meet Centro Hispano Marista

Our school understands that education is a life-long endeavor
One+Centro+Hispano+Marista+family+gathers+around+a+recent+graduate+for+a+photo.
Photographer: Contributed
One Centro Hispano Marista family gathers around a recent graduate for a photo.

For around 2 hours on Tuesday nights, Marist teachers volunteer for a program called Centro Hispano Marista to help adult Hispanic and Latino students earn their GEDs.

A Provincial of the Society of Mary, Reverend Ted Keating was the original leader who brought the idea of this program to Marist. Fr. John Harhager, who was the President of Marist at the time, welcomed the idea proposed to the board in 2011. Classes were first offered in the fall of 2012.

Currently, former Marist President Fr. Bill Rowland is the President of Centro Hispano Marista and leads the organization alongside Dr. Leticia Valencia, the director of Centro.

Each class takes 6 to 12 weeks to complete. In addition to the class hours, students have a weekly average of 6 hours of homework in order to properly prepare for their classes.

Earning a GED provides a wide range of job opportunities to the graduates and helps them improve their career chances. Along with supporting their career goals, Centro also provides an outlet for community building and fosters belonging among the students.

This bridge even extends to home life, where Centro students are able to connect with their kids who might be learning similar material in their own schools.

Centro Hispano Marista is a non profit organization, which demonstrates that Marist to be more than a high school. Marist is a well-rounded, diverse institution which has made education for all the foundation of its mission. This program represents another perspective into the Marist community and demonstrates its passion for formulating a wider family dedicated to learning.

Robotics teacher Christopher Michaud volunteers as a math teacher for the Centro Hispano Marista program. Michaud started teaching math in 2015 and describes his students as, “hardworking and intelligent individuals who balance the adult responsibilities of raising children, working, and a going to school.”

Michaud hopes to continue to dedicate his time to this program and feels greatly rewarded for his impact to his community.

Jose Gregory, a history teacher for both Marist and Centro Hispano Marista, shares his love for Centro. He describes the program as “chicken soup for his soul.”

Gregory is deeply gratified by the opportunity to help advance these students’ potential and career goals. “The program is an opportunity to directly help my own community and those who might be marginalized,” Gregory said.

Since 2012, Centro Hispano Marista has helped more than 400 adult students earn their GEDs and graduates approximately 30 students per year.

 

About the Contributor
Reese Sullivan
Reese Sullivan, Staff Writer
Reese joined the newspaper staff during her junior year because of her love for contributing to culture and literature. At Marist, Reese plays on the varsity soccer team, helps out as a Grade Level Coordinator, and is on the board for Habitat for Humanity. Her hobbies include reading, traveling, and baking. In the future, Reese hopes to become a sports marketer.